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Welcome to the first of a number of pieces that will illuminate the importance of including oil in your lifestyle—qualities I hope you will refuse to live without! The first piece will focus on why I recommend using oil topically on every type of skin.

Oil is a healthy, often easily accessed, natural, and effective ingredient that has myriad uses. There are hundreds and hundreds of types of oil, each with a unique antioxidant breakdown, fatty acid content, molecular structure, and particular benefit to the skin. Applied topically, most oils are safe, effective, and all-natural. Further, they provide unique anti-aging, anti-acne, anti-infection, and anti-irritation benefits. And believe me, that’s only the beginning. Continue Reading »

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Welcome to the blue-ribbon circle of oily skin oils.

When using oil as a moisturizer for oily skin, three things must be considered: texture, scent, and—most importantly!—ability of the oil to clog pores. See below for my top 3 oils to use to moisturize oily skin.

3. Jojoba oil: Almost completely non-comedogenic, medium odour, slightly rich in texture.

2. Grapeseed oil: Almost completely non-comedogenic, mild odour, and light texture.

1. High-linoleic acid safflower oil: Absolutely non-comedogenic, virtually no odour, beautiful golden colour, light texture.

Read my post on this wonderful oil.

Keep in mind that skin that is only moderately oily will benefit from the slightly richer texture of jojoba oil, and those of you without access to a good health food store will find it easiest to purchase grapeseed oil as it can often be found in better grovery stores. In other words, each of these oils is excellent for oily skin—try a blend of two and add a few drops of ylang ylang oil for added astringency!

To learn more about the comedogenecy of different oils, read my post on comedogenic and non-comedogenic oils and stay tuned for more Oil Olympics!

Hot summer day in downtown Toronto…oases ripple on the asphalt, iced tea in dappled sunlight, a patio, a parade—a full and perfect day. I knew the cold pitcher of sangria would make me hungry later but I was prepared. I had a recipe at home just waiting for a day like today. A little bit sweet, a little bit decadent, cool and refreshing Strawberry (and coconut!) Pistachio Bites!

These don’t take long to make and the inclusion of coconut oil make them rich without being greasy and uniquely healthy without being bland.

View the recipe here: http://crazysexylife.com/2011/strawberry-pistachio-bites/

Coconut oil is loved by many as a natural skin and hair moisturizer—stay tuned for a post on why you might want to include this oil in your healthy skin regime!

 


The safflower is a member of the sunflower family and lives up to its name, having yellow, ray-like petals that explode forth in a bright sunburst of a flower. Safflower oil is expressed from the seeds of this plant. There are two types of safflower oil: monounsaturated safflower oil and polyunsaturated safflower oil. Each variety has unique properties that make it suitable for various uses of uses, ranging from use as a cold oil in dressings, to the healthiest oil for frying, to cosmetic and skincare applications, to a mixing medium for oil paints.

But what are the differences between the two varieties of safflower oil? And how to consume each? Continue Reading »

The safflower is a member of the sunflower family and lives up to its reputation, having yellow, ray-like petals that explode forth in a bright sunburst of a flower. Safflower oil is expressed from the seeds of this plant. There are two types of safflower oil: monounsaturated safflower oil and polyunsaturated safflower oil Each variety has unique properties that make it suitable for various uses of uses, ranging from use as a cold oil in dressings, to the healthiest oil for frying, to cosmetic and skincare applications, to a mixing medium for oil paints.

For more information on cooking with and consuming each variety of safflower oil, see my post here.

So, when is sunshine best for your skin? Continue Reading »

Tamanu oil is a prodigy of an oil—it can do many things very, very well. It has antibacterial and anti-fungal properties, helps cells regenerate more quickly, is brimming with antioxidants, provides pain relief when applied topically, and studies have shown that it has some efficacy in successfully attacking a certain type of skin cancer cell.1

And it is a beautiful oil. It is also known as “green gold” and its colour is a unique, warm, blackened green. It is opulent and plush, with a rich almost-toasted odour. Is this what a dragon’s tears might look like?

Tamanu oil is, without a doubt, a valuable oil…but what can it do for your skin and, the Big Question: is it non-comedogenic? Continue Reading »

Nothing like flowers to quiet the mind and a walk to pique the appetite. That’s how I find myself here—I have plans to make sautéed kale, mushrooms, and rice for lunch and have been hunting online for the best way to cook kale. As I learned today, kale is on the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) list of fruits and vegetables with the highest levels of pesticides and should always be bought from an organic farm or distributer (Click here to view the EWG’s list—in printable, wallet-sized format).

Kale is an Extremely Important Vegetable (one of the best, in fact). It is very high in cancer-preventing antioxidants, helps the body eliminate toxic chemicals, lowers cholesterol levels, and helps to reduces inflammation throughout the body. A super-vegetable! You can find out more about kale here, at the very comprehensive WH Foods website.

In Canada you can almost always find organic kale at Loblaws and most certainly at the St. Lawrence Market farmer’s market or the market at the Evergreen Brickworks.

So, the best way to cook kale? Steam it for 5 minutes. Or, as I will, steam for 5 minutes, sauté with mushrooms for a minute or so, toss with rice bran oil, and enjoy with a side of brown rice. And a glass of chardonnay!

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